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Two weeks in May

It's taken me near a month to realize that my spring schedule just doesn't give me the time to blog. Where I prefer to post two or three times a week, with each post on a different project, I find I just don't have the mental reserves. I'm going to have to resort to kitchen sink posts if I want to properly catalog what I've been doing and get through my busy season.

If it wasn't for some semblance of recording on Ravelry, the details of at least four of my recent projects would be lost to the ether.

Herbed Carrots Sock
Somewhere on or around May 12th I finished up Herbed Carrots.



It's pretty obvious there is more than a little difference in the sock colors. As they were knit from the same skein, it can't be a dye lot issue. As well, the lack of color in one sock over another means I don't have to blame my math or my gauge this time. It's the nature of indie yarns, plain and simple. And I can live with that, as these will be fabulously warm socks.

This J. Knits yarn was supercalifragilisticispyalidocious to work with. A little splitty, yes, but this is more than made up for by it's silky texture and sheen. Yummy.

Sherbert Bayerishe
After running out to get new yarn two weeks ago, I began knitting Eunny Jang's Bayerische a third time.

(picture taken a week ago)

I began using a toe up version of the pattern, found on Ravelry and written by The Knitting Swede. The pattern was a nightmare. Nightmare, I tell you! All I can say is that without Ravelry, I may have just hunted that poor pattern writer down and gone apepoop on her. Luckily for everyone involved another raveller posted notes on her toe up version and I was able get the crazy under control before the authorities had to be called in.

I was able to calmly add an editorial note to her Ravelry pattern page and she has since updated her web page to include the errata I came across, so there's that. The only thing harmed was the notion that I am a bonafide, mature adult.

The yarn is an unknown. I am pretty sure it's Madelinetosh, but it was tagless at the LYS. Now there was a time I thought I'd never knit with her yarn again, but after seeing how well my Watermelon Firestarters have fared after lots of wash and wear, I'm a convert.

Spinning
I'm not much further along on the Sherbert B than what is shown in the picture above, as I have been distracted by spinning and other knitting. The video that came with the kit has been really helpful for me to understand the dynamics. The day after the festival (May 11) I was plugging away at it. I still can't drop the spindle yet, but I have mastered a beginner's technique enough to spin these:


I'm running out of roving, so I may just have to go trek out to the Massachusetts Sheep and Wool festival this weekend to stock up. (I'm not sure if I'm serious here, I'll know come Friday.) The natural correidale has a distinct farm barn smell to it, which I absolutely love. Is that wacky?

I met up with my Dad and Chris on Saturday at the Brimfield Fair. Instead of knitting my way there, I spun. It was my first time at this ginormous event and my utter boredom amongst all the bric a brac put my utter absorption with fiber, at the NHSW festival the week before, in sharp relief.

My continued fascination with fiber and knitting amazes me. The only constant thing in my entire life was the fact that I never was interested in anything for that long. I drew, played guitar, sculpted, painted, etc. But I would always come up against some technical hurdle that would loom too large to interest me in overcoming. Not with my knitting. Surely there are obstacles, but I find I am committed to overcoming whatever I've come up against. It gives me a sense of pride, something which has always been in short supply.

Midnight Derby
And finally, the socks I have been working on.


This picture is from Saturday. Last night I finished turning the heel while inane CBS comedies played on the TV. On the knit side of the heel I knit continental style. As I couldn't master the continental purl method, I worked in my usual, English way. I've been itching to get comfortable with the continental style, as it is faster. My grandmother knits that way and she flies. I found it most difficult at the beginning of the needle. For some reason as soon as I was about five to 10 stitches in, my technique worked better. More practice will help me understand how to improve on this.

The yarn is Dream in Color Smooshy, in the Midnight Derby colorway, which I picked up alongside the Madelinetosh sock yarn two weeks ago. I'm making a pair of socks for my Dad using the 4k1p rib pattern I designed for my Uncle's socks, Blue Wavering. I adore the clean lines of this pattern.

The color saturation in this yarn is amazing, though I fear it's going to bleed like a mofo when I give them their first dunk.

Well, I think that gets me all caught up. Finally.

Happy Tuesday, blogland,

M

Comments

Nell said…
You're a sock knitting champ!!!

Love the herbed carrots. Too bad it wasn't more fun to knit. Hopefully, the end product is worth it!
Knitting Kris said…
I love all the socks. I think the ones that "may" be Madelinetosh are equisite! I love the color!
I know how you feel about posting and spring schedules....My blog has been lacking, and that's an understatement....as I run off to finish cleaning the living room....
Shannon said…
Your socks are amazing as usual. I especially love the Herbed Carrots.

My blog has also been lacking due to crazy work demands. Hopefully I can redeem myself in a couple of weeks.
peaknits said…
Socks, and the beginnings of more socks are AWESOME! I love the fabric of the Smoosgy, need to try that. Keep us posted on the bleeding.
ZantiMissKnit said…
this whole paragraph:

>>>My continued fascination with fiber and knitting amazes me. The only constant thing in my entire life was the fact that I never was interested in anything for that long. I drew, played guitar, sculpted, painted, etc. But I would always come up against some technical hurdle that would loom too large to interest me in overcoming. Not with my knitting. Surely there are obstacles, but I find I am committed to overcoming whatever I've come up against. It gives me a sense of pride, something which has always been in short supply.<<<

could have been written by me if you replace "guitar" with "drums". Seriously! I don't know wny I'm able to go head-on into the obstacles in knitting except for the fact that I am able to sit on my butt the whole time.
Knitting Kris said…
Did you get my e-mail? I sent it to your e-mail on the blog. Let me know - yarny goodness awaits! :)